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The programme will focus on three major areas:

  1. Balancing regulation of individual health professionals and of health services
  2. Health professional regulation and trade agreements: Protecting the public versus facilitating commerce
  3. The Sustainable Development Goals 2016-2030 and WHO Global Strategy on Human Resources for Health: Workforce 2030 – implications for Health Regulation

 

These three main themes will be developed through plenary sessions with key note speakers and panel discussions.

Balancing regulation of individual health professionals and of health services

In recent years, the scope of regulation in the health workplace has extended beyond licensing of individual health professionals to regulation of health service delivery including workplace credentialing or accreditation arrangements. Regulation of health service delivery is sometimes introduced within workplaces to assist in providing access to safe care when demand for services exceeds supply of regulated health professionals. Health service regulation is designed to facilitate delivery of comprehensive, efficient and effective health care by promoting a local workplace culture of safety and quality.

It is important that the requirements established by overlapping regulatory systems align to deliver patient-centred care that integrates safety and quality. Regulating the individual and the environment in which they practice may promote synergistic systems and enhance quality and safety or they may lead to over-regulation.  Principles such as applying the minimum regulatory force to manage risk can help to reduce unnecessary regulatory burden. Risk based models of regulation may help to guide regulators and facilitate “right” touch regulation.  

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of the session, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the benefits and challenges of regulation of health service delivery
  • Identify the key elements of workplace credentialing or accreditation arrangements
  • Discuss principles of risk-based approaches to regulation and the concept of “right” touch regulation

Health professional regulation and trade agreements: Protecting the public versus facilitating commerce

Healthcare systems are becoming more complex and increasingly diverse. At the same time, regional integration and globalisation are opening borders between countries. Bilateral and multilateral trade agreements between governments further support movement of goods and services between relevant countries.

Agencies and organisations whose prime focus and mandate are not health-related are making decisions that have a growing impact on the regulation of healthcare professionals and practice. Trade agreements often embed mutual recognition clauses that facilitate free movement of individuals between relevant countries. Healthcare professionals may be entitled to move freely across borders and health profession regulators may be required to issue licenses/register individuals solely on the basis of their right to practise in another country.

This type of arrangement may promote business and commercial interests but creates challenges for regulators responsible for protecting the public interest.

 If effective regulation of healthcare professionals within individual countries is weakened by bilateral and multilateral trade agreements, would development of regulatory approaches and standards at an international level be a better alternative to assuring the public interest is protected?

This session will address the following issues:

  • Drivers to establish frameworks for international health professional regulation.
  • Examples of best practices approaches to establishing international regulation
  • Benefits and challenges of mutual recognition arrangements
  • Impact of regulatory reform in other sectors on health care and health professionals regulation

Learning objectives:

At the conclusion of the session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the challenges and opportunities associated with free trade agreements
  • Identify global reforms influencing the regulation of healthcare professionals;
  • Highlight the challenges created by these reforms;
  • Summarise best practice approaches to establishing international regulation of health professionals.

 


The Sustainable Development Goals 2016-2030 and WHO Global Strategy on Human Resources for Health: Workforce 2030 – implications for Health Regulation

The aims of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals up to the end of 2015 were to reduce extreme poverty, to halt the spread of HIV/AIDS and to provide universal primary education. In 2014, the international community and stakeholders around the world engaged in a process to negotiate a new global framework to maintain a focus on ensuring a life of dignity for all over the next 15 years. The efforts of the international community in 2014 have resulted in the Sustainable Development Goals for 2016-2030. These goals include 13 health targets and a commitment to universal health coverage.

Health workforce is a critical enabler to achieving the health-related targets of the Sustainable Development Goals 2016-2030. In 2014, the member states of the World Health Organisation (WHO) adopted a resolution to develop a Global Strategy on Human Resources for Health (HRH) and agreed to submit this strategy at the World Health Assembly in May 2016, right after our WHPA regulation conference. The objectives of this new HRH strategy are to implement evidence based HRH policies, to align investment in HRH, to build HRH capacity (including recruitment, development, training and retention of health workforce) and to establish monitoring and accountability of HRH.

The influence of both the Sustainable Development Goals 2016-2030 and the HRH strategy on the health workforce will be presented in this session. A panel discussion will explore the opportunities and challenges for health professional regulation in supporting and implementing these two key global strategies.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of the session, participants will be able to:

  • Summarize the influence of the Sustainable Development Goals and the WHO Global Strategy on Human Resources for Health on the health workforce, internationally and nationally.
  • Identify the opportunities and challenges for health professional regulation in assisting the international community to achieve the desired strategic outcomes
  • Consider how health professional regulators could be best prepared to support implementation of these two strategies

 

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VENUE:
Crowne Plaza Hotel
Avenue Louis-Casaï 75-77
1216 Cointrin
Geneva, Switzerland

DATES:
21 & 22 May 2016

CONTACT:
whprc2016@fdiworldental.org
     
 

The World Health Professions Regulation Conference is hosted by the World Health Professions Alliance

 

 
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